Chrys

Oct 20

50 questions

1: What would you name your future daughter?

2: Do you miss anyone?

3: What if I told you that you were pretty?

4: Ever been told “it’s not you, it’s me”?

5: What are you looking forward to in the next week?

6: Did you go out or stay in last night?

7: How late did you stay up last night?

8: Honestly, has anyone seen you in your underwear in the past 3 months?

9: What were you doing at 12:30 this afternoon?

10: Have you ever told somebody you loved them and not actually meant it?

11: Could you go for the rest of your life without drinking alcohol?

12: Have you pretended to like someone?

13: Could you go the rest of your life without smoking a cigarette?

14: Is there one person in your life that can always make you smile?

15: Is it hard for you to get over someone?

16: Think back five months ago, were you single?

17: Have you ever cried from being so mad?

18: Hold hands with anyone this week?

19: Did your last kiss take place in/on a bed?

20: Who did you last see in person?

21: What is the last thing you said out lot?

22: Have you kissed three or more people in one night?

23: Have you ever been to Paris?

24: Are you good at hiding your feelings?

25: Do you use chap stick?

26: Who did you last share a bed with?

27: Are you listening to music right now?

28: What is something you currently want right now?

29: Were your last three kisses from the same person?

30: How is your heart lately?

31: Do you wear the hood on your hoodie?

32: When was the last time a member of the opposite sex hugged you?

33: What do people call you?

34: Have you ever wanted to tell someone something but didn’t?

35: Are there any stressful situations in your life?

36: What are you listening to right now?

37: What is wrong with you right now?

38: Love really is a beautiful thing huh?

39: Do you make wishes at 11:11?

40: What is on your wrists right now?

41: Are you single/taken/heartbroken/confused/waiting for the unexpected?

42: Where did you get the shirt/sweatshirt you’re wearing?

43: Have you ever regretted kissing someone?

44: Have you hugged someone within the last week?

45: Have you kissed anyone in the last five days?

46: What were you doing at midnight last night?

47: Do you miss the way things were six months ago?

48: Would you rather sleep with someone else or alone?

49: Have you ever been to New York?

50: Think of the last person who said I love you, do you think they meant it?

(via envy-breeds-hate-tonight)

PLZ

(via hellaxhomo)

(via mommatabs)


Oct 19

Pictures from the pumpkin patch and Baughers with my BFF, her husband, and my niece ❤️


34 weeks

34 weeks


From my baby shower last weekend ❤️


Oct 16
fuckyeahmumblrs:

10 True Things About the First Year of Parenthood
I did a ridiculous amount of reading when I was pregnant. I read natural parenting books and baby scheduling books and how to make your baby happy with no crying and eating is good for everyone led by the spirit of “your baby, yourself” books. If there was a book to read, rest assured, I gave it a go. I thought I knew everything I’d need to know.
How much of that information did I actually use? Some. A little. The best bits of this, a quick trick from that, but no single book was spot-on accurate, and nothing was anywhere near as easy as all my reading had led me to believe. Fable was just herself, and apparently, she hadn’t been reading the same stuff I’d been bingeing on. All that reading was mostly a waste of time.*
These are the words I wish I’d read instead, before jumping headlong into the mommyhood with my books and my charts and my ideals and my high horses. They’re flawed, and they aren’t all pretty, but they’re hard-won and honest and as true as I can get ‘em.
Here’s what I wish I’d known:
1. You are going to suck at this parenting gig and be awesome at it at the same time, all the time. You will be a different parent every morning to a child who will also be different, sometimes changing in just hours, or minutes, or before your eyes. There will be good days and bad days, good minutes and bad minutes, good choices and not-so-good ones. You will do some things, probably a lot of things, wrong. Be gentle with yourself, because you are wildly loved and incredibly needed. You are climbing Mt. Everest with basically zero conditioning — expect to be kind of terrible at it for a while. You are beautiful. We are for you.
2. Postpartum bodies are squashy and wobbly and dimpled and stretched and foreign and embarrassing and difficult and painful and gorgeously imperfect, and they tend to stay that way for quite awhile. You made a human. Now make your peace. Eat good food. Walk around when you’re well enough. Listen to the people who tell you you’re beautiful. Take them at their word. Remember where your worth comes from.
3. Your baby is not like the other babies.  Your baby is the only one of herself who has ever been, and you and your partner are the only experts on her. Your baby will not behave like the books say, won’t like what she’s supposed to like, won’t do what she’s supposed to do when she’s supposed to do it, and that’s normal and great and perfectly OK. The best thing you can do is put down your literature and get to know your baby. What does she like? What makes her laugh? How does she best fall asleep? What does hungry sound like? The discovery of these things will serve you so much more than any stranger’s care instructions ever will. You don’t have to make your life or your family look like any particular model — you don’t have to follow the rules. You just have to create a life that works for you and fosters love and security and a whole lot of laughter. If that looks like 2 a.m. pancake parties, I’m not going to tell on you. I might actually admire you and be just a little bit jealous.
4. We have got to stop telling people that things should be easy and painless.  We live in a culture that equates ease with value — the easier it is, the better it is; if it hurts you, something is wrong. Reality check: sometimes things that are hard and painful are also really, really good. Every once in a while as a parent, one of the things that you thought would be really difficult turns out to be incredibly easy and drama-free. This is called a miracle, and though it might be somehow related to some book you read and the alignment of the stars and a magic way you pat the soles of your baby’s feet and the tea you drink on Thursdays, it’s still mostly a miracle, and the odds of that same miracle happening to EVERY OTHER PARENT EVERYWHERE are pretty slim, even with books and stars and tea and so much foot-patting. We get excited in our victories, and want to share them, but it’s important to remember that we are all struggling with different issues. One daddy’s easy is some mama’s nightmare. And just because your baby doesn’t sleep through the night at five weeks or eat with a fork by her first birthday or cries a lot or your boobs get sore from breastfeeding (even though her latch is perfect) — just because it isn’t EASY and PAINLESS — it isn’t necessarily wrong. Sometimes hard is OK, sometimes, often, it’s even good. Hard is how we grow. And guess what, kiddo — parenting is hard. Any book that tells you otherwise deserves the big fat sticker of bullshit.
5. Speaking of bullshit, oh mylanta, the poop.  They warn you. They tell you. And despite every warning, it is still baffling and alarming and downright awe-inspiring how much of your next year is going to be spent dealing with, assessing, smelling for, washing off, evaluating, discussing, logging and transporting poop. Get good and comfy with poop, friends. The poop cometh. For whom the poop tolls. The hunt for poop-tober — you get the idea.
6. The sooner you can figure out how to accept unwanted advice gracefully, the easier your year is going to be. For whatever reason, people love to weigh in on babies — everyone has an opinion, and everyone wants to share. I believe that most of this advice is pretty well-intended — most of it falls into the “it worked for me and I am so happy and I want to share my joy joy joy with you because you look very tired” category, which is at least only mildly offensive and really very sincere.
Here’s the thing — you can stumble through this crazy first 12 months in defense mode, snapping witty comebacks at judgmental old ladies or know-it-all childless people, or you can decide to give everybody the benefit of the doubt, smile and say thank you, and become very zen and confident about knowing what’s best for your child and not giving one ounce of your abundance of poop about what anyone else says.
If I were you, I’d aim for zen.
Nobody is out to get you. Everyone wants you to succeed. And screw them all anyway, because you are raising a child, and that is awesome. Did your kid eat something today? Is she relatively hygienically sound? Smiles occasionally? You win all the things. You are awesome enough to absorb any and all commentary, keep the bits you like, and toss the bits you don’t. How sweet of them to care.
7. Start stretching, because it’s time to get flexible.  I’m not a big fan of general statements like “All babies like swaddling,” or “Co-sleeping is best for everybody,” but there is one I can get behind — babies are really inconvenient. Your schedule, your sleep, your stellar punctuality record, your deadlines, your best shirts, your relationships — everything is about to get messy and complicated. You have two choices: become a cweepinghungrytiredmess of doom, or swallow every ounce of pride you have and become flexible. Ask for help. Admit failure. Be late. Stay in your pajamas. Ignore the dishes. Let slide what can slide and rejoice when you make it through with all your bare necessities intact. You are going to miss a few parties and a lot of snoozes and probably many other important things, and it will be OK. It will be better than OK. It will be amazing.
Maybe, just maybe, you’ll be one of those parents who gets a magic baby who responds to the methods in whatever book you read or is just naturally benevolent and fits like a glove into your fabulous and organized life. Again, this is called a miracle. We love you and are happy for you. Now please, shut up.
8. The most important thing to get for your baby is not a Rock n’ Play, nor a good set of swaddling blankets, nor a high-end stroller. The most important thing to get for your baby is a village. Your village will keep you afloat. They will carry you when you are tired, feed you when you are starving, forgive you when you are unkempt and hours late and a neglectful friend who can’t remember to wear socks let alone whose birthday it is. They will love your baby when you are too tired or frustrated to hold her at the moment, because you are imperfect and human and have imperfect and human failings. They will remind you who you are when you start to think your whole life is only about poop. They will lift you up.
9. We have to lift each other up.  Raising babies is the hardest thing many of us have ever done. We can tear each other to bits, criticize choices and turn up noses, or we can love each other, admire adorable babies, offer a hand and celebrate victories. This is not a difficult choice, people. Nobody cares that your way is better. Everyone cares that your kid is gorgeous and let’s chat over coffee and what have you been doing with your hair lately because, girlfriend, you look fabulous. Don’t be horrible. It isn’t really that hard.
10. Success is found in being willing to grow.  Here’s the truth: you don’t know much of anything. A year from now, after your fantastic kid turns 1, you won’t know much of anything still. Gather wisdom around you. Learn from your mistakes. Stay humble. Stay open. When you know better, do better. Be a better parent tomorrow than you were today, always, everyday, as often as you can. Try things out and leave them behind shamelessly if they don’t work out. Life isn’t a contest or a game — it’s simply only beautifully life. Live the minutes instead of scoring them. Love that incredible baby.
Oh, lovely — you are going to have so much fun!
___________________________________________________
One of my family members shared on Facebook and I felt compelled to share it here with you all as well. Love it <3 -B

fuckyeahmumblrs:

10 True Things About the First Year of Parenthood

I did a ridiculous amount of reading when I was pregnant. I read natural parenting books and baby scheduling books and how to make your baby happy with no crying and eating is good for everyone led by the spirit of “your baby, yourself” books. If there was a book to read, rest assured, I gave it a go.

I thought I knew everything I’d need to know.

How much of that information did I actually use? Some. A little. The best bits of this, a quick trick from that, but no single book was spot-on accurate, and nothing was anywhere near as easy as all my reading had led me to believe. Fable was just herself, and apparently, she hadn’t been reading the same stuff I’d been bingeing on. All that reading was mostly a waste of time.*

These are the words I wish I’d read instead, before jumping headlong into the mommyhood with my books and my charts and my ideals and my high horses. They’re flawed, and they aren’t all pretty, but they’re hard-won and honest and as true as I can get ‘em.

Here’s what I wish I’d known:

1. You are going to suck at this parenting gig and be awesome at it at the same time, all the time. You will be a different parent every morning to a child who will also be different, sometimes changing in just hours, or minutes, or before your eyes. There will be good days and bad days, good minutes and bad minutes, good choices and not-so-good ones. You will do some things, probably a lot of things, wrong. Be gentle with yourself, because you are wildly loved and incredibly needed. You are climbing Mt. Everest with basically zero conditioning — expect to be kind of terrible at it for a while. You are beautiful. We are for you.

2. Postpartum bodies are squashy and wobbly and dimpled and stretched and foreign and embarrassing and difficult and painful and gorgeously imperfect, and they tend to stay that way for quite awhile. You made a human. Now make your peace. Eat good food. Walk around when you’re well enough. Listen to the people who tell you you’re beautiful. Take them at their word. Remember where your worth comes from.

3. Your baby is not like the other babies. Your baby is the only one of herself who has ever been, and you and your partner are the only experts on her. Your baby will not behave like the books say, won’t like what she’s supposed to like, won’t do what she’s supposed to do when she’s supposed to do it, and that’s normal and great and perfectly OK. The best thing you can do is put down your literature and get to know your baby. What does she like? What makes her laugh? How does she best fall asleep? What does hungry sound like? The discovery of these things will serve you so much more than any stranger’s care instructions ever will. You don’t have to make your life or your family look like any particular model — you don’t have to follow the rules. You just have to create a life that works for you and fosters love and security and a whole lot of laughter. If that looks like 2 a.m. pancake parties, I’m not going to tell on you. I might actually admire you and be just a little bit jealous.

4. We have got to stop telling people that things should be easy and painless. We live in a culture that equates ease with value — the easier it is, the better it is; if it hurts you, something is wrong. Reality check: sometimes things that are hard and painful are also really, really good. Every once in a while as a parent, one of the things that you thought would be really difficult turns out to be incredibly easy and drama-free. This is called a miracle, and though it might be somehow related to some book you read and the alignment of the stars and a magic way you pat the soles of your baby’s feet and the tea you drink on Thursdays, it’s still mostly a miracle, and the odds of that same miracle happening to EVERY OTHER PARENT EVERYWHERE are pretty slim, even with books and stars and tea and so much foot-patting. We get excited in our victories, and want to share them, but it’s important to remember that we are all struggling with different issues. One daddy’s easy is some mama’s nightmare. And just because your baby doesn’t sleep through the night at five weeks or eat with a fork by her first birthday or cries a lot or your boobs get sore from breastfeeding (even though her latch is perfect) — just because it isn’t EASY and PAINLESS — it isn’t necessarily wrong. Sometimes hard is OK, sometimes, often, it’s even good. Hard is how we grow. And guess what, kiddo — parenting is hard. Any book that tells you otherwise deserves the big fat sticker of bullshit.

5. Speaking of bullshit, oh mylanta, the poop. They warn you. They tell you. And despite every warning, it is still baffling and alarming and downright awe-inspiring how much of your next year is going to be spent dealing with, assessing, smelling for, washing off, evaluating, discussing, logging and transporting poop. Get good and comfy with poop, friends. The poop cometh. For whom the poop tolls. The hunt for poop-tober — you get the idea.

6. The sooner you can figure out how to accept unwanted advice gracefully, the easier your year is going to be. For whatever reason, people love to weigh in on babies — everyone has an opinion, and everyone wants to share. I believe that most of this advice is pretty well-intended — most of it falls into the “it worked for me and I am so happy and I want to share my joy joy joy with you because you look very tired” category, which is at least only mildly offensive and really very sincere.

Here’s the thing — you can stumble through this crazy first 12 months in defense mode, snapping witty comebacks at judgmental old ladies or know-it-all childless people, or you can decide to give everybody the benefit of the doubt, smile and say thank you, and become very zen and confident about knowing what’s best for your child and not giving one ounce of your abundance of poop about what anyone else says.

If I were you, I’d aim for zen.

Nobody is out to get you. Everyone wants you to succeed. And screw them all anyway, because you are raising a child, and that is awesome. Did your kid eat something today? Is she relatively hygienically sound? Smiles occasionally? You win all the things. You are awesome enough to absorb any and all commentary, keep the bits you like, and toss the bits you don’t. How sweet of them to care.

7. Start stretching, because it’s time to get flexible. I’m not a big fan of general statements like “All babies like swaddling,” or “Co-sleeping is best for everybody,” but there is one I can get behind — babies are really inconvenient. Your schedule, your sleep, your stellar punctuality record, your deadlines, your best shirts, your relationships — everything is about to get messy and complicated. You have two choices: become a cweepinghungrytiredmess of doom, or swallow every ounce of pride you have and become flexible. Ask for help. Admit failure. Be late. Stay in your pajamas. Ignore the dishes. Let slide what can slide and rejoice when you make it through with all your bare necessities intact. You are going to miss a few parties and a lot of snoozes and probably many other important things, and it will be OK. It will be better than OK. It will be amazing.

Maybe, just maybe, you’ll be one of those parents who gets a magic baby who responds to the methods in whatever book you read or is just naturally benevolent and fits like a glove into your fabulous and organized life. Again, this is called a miracle. We love you and are happy for you. Now please, shut up.

8. The most important thing to get for your baby is not a Rock n’ Play, nor a good set of swaddling blankets, nor a high-end stroller. The most important thing to get for your baby is a village. Your village will keep you afloat. They will carry you when you are tired, feed you when you are starving, forgive you when you are unkempt and hours late and a neglectful friend who can’t remember to wear socks let alone whose birthday it is. They will love your baby when you are too tired or frustrated to hold her at the moment, because you are imperfect and human and have imperfect and human failings. They will remind you who you are when you start to think your whole life is only about poop. They will lift you up.

9. We have to lift each other up. Raising babies is the hardest thing many of us have ever done. We can tear each other to bits, criticize choices and turn up noses, or we can love each other, admire adorable babies, offer a hand and celebrate victories. This is not a difficult choice, people. Nobody cares that your way is better. Everyone cares that your kid is gorgeous and let’s chat over coffee and what have you been doing with your hair lately because, girlfriend, you look fabulous. Don’t be horrible. It isn’t really that hard.

10. Success is found in being willing to grow. Here’s the truth: you don’t know much of anything. A year from now, after your fantastic kid turns 1, you won’t know much of anything still. Gather wisdom around you. Learn from your mistakes. Stay humble. Stay open. When you know better, do better. Be a better parent tomorrow than you were today, always, everyday, as often as you can. Try things out and leave them behind shamelessly if they don’t work out. Life isn’t a contest or a game — it’s simply only beautifully life. Live the minutes instead of scoring them. Love that incredible baby.

Oh, lovely — you are going to have so much fun!

___________________________________________________

One of my family members shared on Facebook and I felt compelled to share it here with you all as well. Love it <3 -B

(via mehimandbaby)



Oct 15

wolfettet:

*When people talk shit about my pregnancy/ birthing/parenting choices*

I’m sorry. Who’s womb carried this baby for nearly 40 weeks? Who went into labor for numerous hours? Who’s stomach got cut open/vagina did this baby get pushed out of? Who’s responsible for feeding, nurturing, and providing for this baby?

Not YOU. So sit that ass down.

Reblogging this for later


wishing-for-baby-bean:

lesbianfamilies:

mamaandherbabybyrd:

I got off birth control when I was 18. I was on the depo shot and it took me about 18 months to become regular again. The next few years we used the ‘pull out method’ (yes, I know I know). But it worked for us.. no accidents over the next 2 1/2 ish years. January 2012 we decided to stop using that method and to see what happens. January 2012 through December 2012… no pregnancy. In December 2012 I decided to officially start TTC. We bought ovulation predictor kits (OPKs) and started BBT charting and planned baby dancing all around my fertile times. Dec 2012 through October 2013… Big Fat Negatives all around. I was extremely depressed, stressed, and worried it was never gonna happen for us. In November we had sex November 6th (CD9). I usually ovulate on CD 14-17 depending. I had a freakishly early O (CD11) and with that one time that month.. we got our BFP! Total shock and biggest blessing. The wait while TTC was absolute torture, but I know that Zuri was just the little bean that was meant to join us in this world and we had to wait for her &lt;3

With my wife it took 4 cycles over 6mo period ,she got pregnant feb 2012 and With me it took 2 cycles  back to back. We ttc in October 2013 and November 2013 I got pregnant.  (2 cycles).

It took us 4 cycles. I got pregnant June 7, 2014.

Our &#8220;plan&#8221; was to stop BC and let God take control. Stopped taking the pill on Christmas, got pregnant February 28th, and little man will be here next month! We were very blessed as far as how quickly I became pregnant, because other than stopping the pill, we were not trying by any means

wishing-for-baby-bean:

lesbianfamilies:

mamaandherbabybyrd:

I got off birth control when I was 18. I was on the depo shot and it took me about 18 months to become regular again. The next few years we used the ‘pull out method’ (yes, I know I know). But it worked for us.. no accidents over the next 2 1/2 ish years. January 2012 we decided to stop using that method and to see what happens. January 2012 through December 2012… no pregnancy. In December 2012 I decided to officially start TTC. We bought ovulation predictor kits (OPKs) and started BBT charting and planned baby dancing all around my fertile times. Dec 2012 through October 2013… Big Fat Negatives all around. I was extremely depressed, stressed, and worried it was never gonna happen for us. In November we had sex November 6th (CD9). I usually ovulate on CD 14-17 depending. I had a freakishly early O (CD11) and with that one time that month.. we got our BFP! Total shock and biggest blessing. The wait while TTC was absolute torture, but I know that Zuri was just the little bean that was meant to join us in this world and we had to wait for her <3

With my wife it took 4 cycles over 6mo period ,she got pregnant feb 2012 and With me it took 2 cycles back to back. We ttc in October 2013 and November 2013 I got pregnant. (2 cycles).

It took us 4 cycles. I got pregnant June 7, 2014.

Our “plan” was to stop BC and let God take control. Stopped taking the pill on Christmas, got pregnant February 28th, and little man will be here next month! We were very blessed as far as how quickly I became pregnant, because other than stopping the pill, we were not trying by any means


Oct 14

Sunday was our baby shower and I was soooo blessed and in shock by all the nice things we got for Hunter. Reality set in, however, when I got home and was organizing everything and I realized that we really didn’t get any essentials. (Aka three packs of diapers, a couple wipes, and one thing of Johnson’s wash) and I in NO way want to be or seem ungrateful but now we are kinda freaking out because Evan got a new job and starts at the end of the month but that will make November VERY tight for us financially because we won’t get his first real and normal check until December 1st, and I could already be on maternity leave by then (with shortened pay because of short term disability). Sooo thank God my grandma gave us a little money instead of a gift and we went last night to target to stock up on some essentials. And now the fun begins with endless laundry because the majority of gifts we got was clothing or blankets for H. Also my aunts from NJ shocked us and bought us a crib, mattress, and 8 sets of sheets. So in all, we really were blessed with nice things for H, now we just have to stock up on diapers and essentials!!


Oct 13
This girl could go on file as the biggest pain in my butt sometimes, but she has a heart of gold and I have been blessed by her and her friendship. So lucky to have you as &#8220;Aunt Caitlyn&#8221; to Hunter. I love you Cait 💕

This girl could go on file as the biggest pain in my butt sometimes, but she has a heart of gold and I have been blessed by her and her friendship. So lucky to have you as “Aunt Caitlyn” to Hunter. I love you Cait 💕


BFFs since we were 7. So blessed to have her in my life and as Hunter&#8217;s Godmommy. I love you @ashley814 💕

BFFs since we were 7. So blessed to have her in my life and as Hunter’s Godmommy. I love you @ashley814 💕


bottles-and-booties:

pr1nceshawn:

Husbands can be incredibly helpful.

My husband is notorious for giving Happy Birthday cards

(via wishing-for-baby-bean)


Oct 11
yourbabylibrary:

At this time in your pregnancy your baby is about 17.1 inches long and weighs over 4 lbs. As your pregnancy continues your baby will continue to get longer and gain weight. http://bit.ly/STdIjY

yourbabylibrary:

At this time in your pregnancy your baby is about 17.1 inches long and weighs over 4 lbs. As your pregnancy continues your baby will continue to get longer and gain weight. http://bit.ly/STdIjY


33 weeks!!!

33 weeks!!!


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